Writing Clips

Below you will find a selection of published pieces, including news stories, blogs and features.

PUBLISHER:

Clinton Life

Secret City Life

Metro Phoenix Project (name not yet released to public)

CREATIVE FICTION

No Certainty in Life

WORK HISTORY

2013-2014: Editor of six community magazines in the Knoxville, Tenn., area

2012-2013: Editor of a 24/7 online newspaper – Snellville Patch

2011-2012: Copy editor for Women’s Views on News

1999-2012: Private music instructor, freelance writer

NEWS STORIES and COLUMNS

Wednesday’s Woman:  Alisa Boykin

Wednesday’s Woman:  Beth Rhodes

Occupy Atlanta Departing Rorey Family Home

Making a Medical Difference in Sierra Leone

Snellville Remembers 9/11:  Mayor Jerry Oberholtzer

The Community of Bosniaks Wraps Up Ramadan

Awaiting a Perfect Match

Hispanic Congregations Offer Sense of Community

Snellville’s Past:  Spotlight on the Livseys

BLOGS

The Girl Effect, published on The Socially Conscious Blog
Preview

The Girl Effect  is ‘a movement driven by girl champions around the globe.’

When a girl living in poverty turns 12, her life reaches a crossroads.

One path has her marrying – one in seven marry at the age of 14 in developing parts of the world – becoming pregnant by 15, possibly contracting HIV, and possibly forced to sell her body in order to survive.

The other path is much brighter – receive an education, stay healthy, marry when she chooses and raise a healthy family.

Ashoka, Published on The Socially Conscious Blog
Preview

In a world of capitalist businessmen and women whose main interest lies in their green bottom line, Ashoka goes against the grain by bringing the rare individual – whose purpose is to save the world – into the spotlight.

Ashoka describes itself as the “global association of the world’s leading social entrepreneurs.” It invests in people.

Interview With UN Humanitarian Ambassador to Somalia Mark Bowden, published on Foreign Policy Association
Preview

In a press release issued on July 20, ActionAid International talked about a new problem facing the citizens of Somalia and Kenya– stomach binding.  In response to intense hunger and no way to curb it, women are tying ropes or cloths around their stomach in an effort to go about their daily lives without suffering.

This practice is not new, and has been done for generations as famine and hunger enters their lives over and over.  As the drought worsens and famine spreads, more women are resorting to this practice.

FEATURE STORIES

Special Education: Focus on Autism
Preview

About two decades ago, there were just three classes in Gwinnett County schools teaching children with special needs related to autism. Today there are more than 2,400 teachers in special needs classes throughout the entire district, and for good reason.

Some 17,400 students are enrolled in special needs classrooms in Gwinnett County schools, and like so many other districts, officials are seeing a surge of children diagnosed with autism. There are currently about 1,500 students in the district diagnosed with autism. In just the past three years, there has been nearly a 20 percent hike in students with the complex brain disorder, which affects the way children perceive the world, and how they communication and interact with others.

Samira Ahmed: From Abuse to Abundance
Preview

Snellville resident Samira Ahmed, originally from Ethiopia, moved to Clarkston on July 12, 1995.

Part of her story was featured earlier this month, including her transition to life in America and the challenges she and her family faced.  The most challenging event, though, was what she left behind, or rather, who.

AIDS: A Story from the Past
Preview

It was 1989.

My Uncle, Ace Davis, had just died of AIDS.

My mother came home from the funeral and wrapped her arms around my brother and I, hugging us tighter than I remember ever being hugged before.  She was trying so hard not to cry, but couldn’t prevent a few stray tears from trickling down her cheeks.

When I asked what was wrong, she said, “I’m just happy to see you.”


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